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Mapping Women’s Economic Activity in Afghanistan

Founder(s): UN Women
Status: Completed

Supported by UN Women, this project aims to provide a body of knowledge on women’s economic rights that can assist in identifying the best entry points toward increasing their economic activities. The project will combine a review of developments in women’s economic participation in Afghanistan since 2001, analysis and tracking of existing economic laws, policies and financing for gender equity in strategic economic sectors, and field research on the ground to provide as full a picture as possible and highlight opportunities for the future.

The project began in fall 2012, with outputs expected in summer 2013.

Publications from this research project:

Women’s Economic Empowerment in Afghanistan, 2002-2012: Information Mapping and Situational Analysis

In the recent socio-economic culture of Afghanistan, as in most countries since the industrial revolution’s introduction of the artificial division between production and reproduction, women’s participation in the labour economy, whether productive or reproductive, has been invisible and unaccounted for Read More

Women’s Economic Empowerment in Afghanistan: Creating Spaces and Enabling the Environment

This Policy Note is based on research findings which place Afghan women’s inadequate economic participation within the wider frame of the policy environment and deep-rooted socio-cultural barriers.

Women’s Economic Empowerment in Afghanistan, 2002 – 2012 ‘Situational Analysis’

In the recent socio-economic culture of Afghanistan, as in most countries since the industrial revolution’s introduction of the artificial division between production and reproduction, women’s participation in the labour economy, whether productive or reproductive, has been invisible and unaccounted for Read More

Women’s Economic Empowerment in Afghanistan 2002-2012 ‘Information Mapping’

In the recent socio-economic culture of Afghanistan, as in most countries since the industrial revolution’s introduction of the artificial division between production and reproduction, women’s participation in the labour economy, whether productive or reproductive, has been invisible and unaccounted for Read More

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